BomBassic Beat Life Birthday Lovins June 27

So, tomorrow’s my birthday. You’ve probably heard. But on top of that, my boys BomBassic are headlining at The Mothlight for another installment of Beat Life, brought to us by the Asheville Beat Tape Collective. Weeeee

Cpt Hyperdrive and Brucey B of BomBassic are on fire these days. I’ve been seeing them on the regular for nearly two years now, and in their last few shows in AVL alone there’s been an intangible shift in their presence, a sense of greater connectedness between themselves as well as the audience. Maybe it has something to do with their Kinnection experience last month (everyone came back all ONE LOVE and whatnot), or maybe it’s because they’re best friends and play music all the time and are and sinking into both their individual and combined crafts harder than ever. Whatever it is, they gellin. Love those guys.

JUST ANNOUNCED: BomBassic’s set will be amped up with a slew of special guests, including MCs Musashi Xero and Spitty the Sequel, Tin Foil Hat, and DJ Kutzu.

Get there early for sets by Samuel Paradise, Axnt, DJ Kutzu, and Vietnam Jerry. You ready for this? I dunno, watch out for me. I might get rowdy. But it’s my birthday so I do what I want.

10:00p-2:00a

$5 door//21+

Just Trying to Commission Peter Gabriel Remixes is All

peter gabrielI love Peter Gabriel. I listen to and think a lot about him. I just finished his biography Without Frontiers: The Life and Music of Peter Gabriel. What a brain-tickling babe.

For a couple years now I’ve been keeping my ear out for great PG remixes. Just found this dark, synthy version of “Mercy Street” by Virgin Magnetic Material via Soundcloud, which pleases me. I just don’t want to stop at his most well-known songs. I want to go deeper.

Of all his beautiful material, he’s got this song I can’t shake called “No Way Out” from his 2002 album Up. From first listen I envisioned this minimally powerful song remixed into a dance track. That guitar riff, that chorus! That’s all you need. Now I suppose this is what a DJ feels when s/he makes a remix. But I don’t do that. I do this.

I want one of you internet musicians to remix this song. Who’s up to the challenge? There’s a lot of Backstage Sass blog love in it for you. And probably hugs and kisses if you’re local.

 

Even Divas Get the Groupie Chills

So I’m flipping through a book Bette Midler wrote about her first world tour in 1980. In it there is a page entitled “Dear Diary,” in which she discusses her initial discomfort with her groupies (in this case, a pair of young sisters from Idaho) and ultimately her realization that the relationship is a symbiotic one, one that is necessary for her as a performer and a person:

“I guess it’s always troubling to be faced with that kind of devotion. Like most performers, I deal with intense adulation from the multitudes, but as soon as it comes from a focused source…well, that’s another matter altogether. Maybe that’s why so many performer friends of mine refuse to have any dealings with even their most ardent fans…But in some strange way, they give–to me–meaning. I always feel more solid, more real when they’re around. They make me think that maybe there is more to me than I know.”

 

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My Key to the Kingdom: How I Partied With the Rock Stars at Hangout Music Festival

I’m between worlds, done with lunch and not quite ready to kick it in the sand. The shaded patch of sod that transitions the dining hall to the private beach is perfect for this moment, a complimentary Malibu cocktail in one hand, a swag e-cig in the other. The royal gulf waters crash playfully in front of me; the sun shines so hard I think it might burn out. It’s hot at Hangout today, so I’m relaxing before making my way through the throngs for one of my most anticipated sets.

I should be thinking about St. Lucia and how excited I am to see them after my adventures at CounterPoint last year, but instead I’m playing with visions of standing on the side of the main stage at Foster the People later in the evening, a curious occurrence that I’ve always wanted to experience. Who are those people, and how do I get up there? When right then the band and their merry company roll up, I’m not entirely surprised.

There are a number of pale, young, dark-haired musicians wearing Ray Bans here, so when the rambunctious troop plunks down at the oversized chessboard station it takes me a minute to decide if that toothy handsome devil hovering by the palm tree is indeed frontman Mark Foster or not. When I notice he’s pairing his beach threads with white patent leather loafers, I don’t waste another second. I get up to introduce myself.

hangout mark foster

Mark Foster. Photo by Nina Westervelt via nylon.com

I didn’t envision all this a few weeks ago. The plan for that weekend was to go back to the earth–not the stars–at Kinnection Campout, a small intentional gathering right here in the Asheville area. My pals BomBassic were booked for a prime Saturday night set, and most of my crew was going to support them and some other regional artists over an intimate weekend in the midst of Blue Ridge beauty. But my intention took a sharp turn when Marley Carroll informed me he got booked to play a DJ set at Hangout, the rowdy, beachside festival in Gulf Shores, Alabama. He waved the lineup in front of me, all shiny and beautiful with the likes of Future Islands, Phantogram, Beck. My indie pop-loving loins burned.

After discovering this would be my last opportunity to see some of these bands on their current tours, I made the decision to attend. Little in the way of plans were made, though it all fell into place when Marley secured me an artist wristband so I would have access to the artists themselves, as well as the mad comforts and perks. My heart soaring, I went straight to the closet to prepare my outfits. I was going to hang the fuck out.

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Ballin’

We arrived at festival grounds late Friday night to get our credentials and the lay of the wonderland. Headliners Foo Fighters were already on, but my senses were on overload and there was no time for Dave Grohl’s sloppy, five-minute introduction to “Big Me.” I had to pee.

Naturally I searched for the nearest port-a-potty, but the only place in sight was the “VIP” bathroom. I felt an innate wave of reluctance to go in. This place has a sign and actual toilets. Am I allowed? I looked around and realized we were already in the VIP viewing area, having entered from the backstage artist compound. I quickly learned that my glittery, pimp purple wristband would get me a lot farther than some toilets.

Saturday morning I had time to kick around before Marley’s 12:30 set. Back in the artists’ area I was greeted by a well-presented breakfast buffet in divinely-decorated air conditioning. Outside, a smattering of others lay serenely on the beach or sipped morning cocktails in the shade. Aside from my inability to operate the fancy fruit fork in there, I felt at home.

As comfortable as this was, I had shows to see! I slung my CamelBak over my shoulder and skipped down to the beachfront tiki tent to take my place for Marley’s set, which was–surprise surprise–fantastic. His indie house sensitivities weaved effortlessly with an undercurrent of hip-hop and hip-ripping African rhythm, an hour-long wave designed specifically for the environment. And when I found myself trancing out to his original “Woodwork” between the ocean and some hot bitches in patriotic bikinis, I knew Jesus loved me. My blood rushed.

We had a break before Future Islands, a rising synthpop band we were both looking forward to, so we stopped for some chill time in the VIP pool next to the main stage. A metal fence divided the general viewing area from the raucous pool, where people who could afford to drop hundreds and even thousands of dollars on this weekend were afforded the privileges of separatism not even imagined in festival culture a few years ago. The discovery of the free beer bar tickled us both to bits, but at the same time we noted how sad it was that the general population were paying out the nose to get even remotely tipsy, only to sweat it out immediately under the intense heat.

I don’t regret the power I had to luxuriate, and at minimal expenditure at that, but it is clear that the swelling popularity of high-profile, corporate-sponsored mega-fests serves to reflect the growing divide between the everyday person and the financially fortunate, not reconcile it. As the chasm widens, the creative power structure tilts, and as these things tend to go, the sacrifice of the original intention will be railed against.

But when life gives you lemonade, you drink the shit out of it.

Sunday would be my jam. I woke up and prepped myself for eternal sunshine.

I ran into Jean-Philip Grobler of St. Lucia early in the day. I launched into my re-introductions, reminding him of our interview last year, but he convincingly remembered me. It probably helps that I was wearing the exact same loud, pink & teal lycra dress. We discussed their new album and an exquisite electro house band called Goldroom, whose set I stumbled into first thing that morning. Life is pretty.

Supercutie Jean-Philip of St. Lucia. Photo by Nina Westervelt via nylon.com

St. Lucia’s midday show was a highlight, though overly intense due to the raging sun and a couple of douchebag dudes who got even more lame when I asked to hit their joint. (ATTN: BROS AT SHOWS, when a cute dancing girl wants to smoke your weed, you say yes. You just do, weirdos!) They must never get laid. But St. Lucia laid it all down, the core songs from their debut When the Night sprinkled with some exciting new material. Fuuuck yes.

Afterward I went to kick it backstage until the evening. Crossing the patio I was charmed by a production assistant who mistook me for Sarah Barthel from Phantogram (dat hair), a few delicious seconds I savored before I had to deny it. That’s when Foster’s people showed back up, once again obnoxiously taking over the chessboard. Plastic cups and compostable plates soon littered the area.

The key band members weren’t hanging around at this point, but I joined the others to observe the boisterous chess match. I displaced a couple of warm beers from a chair and was immediately welcomed with a quick clean-up of the space by one of the unknowns. I lit a cigarette and had just gotten into my chaw groove when a violent check move sent a 12-inch knight sailing across the board and into my planted foot.

I clocked my throbbing ankle. “Owwwww,” I whined as my sunglasses met my assailant’s, a black-haired boy too cute for his own good.

“Oh, did I get you? I’m so sorry! Want a cigarette?” The sincerity of his apology coupled with the helpful cleaning guy warmed me, and I wondered if I hadn’t misjudged these excitable kids.

“Is it an American Spirit?” I hoped aloud, though I still took the Camel Crush he offered. Later in the evening that total babe would gift me an amethyst because “every beautiful girl needs a beautiful crystal.” That’s how it’s done, dudes and bros.

I’m climbing the steps to the stage, my heart fluttering. Turns out my wristband is my purple ticket to that coveted side-stage viewing I envisioned. Easy enough. The band is well into their first song, and I snuggle up close to the row of people already lining the railing. I will sing in their ears and dry hump them until they squirm away. I don’t care who they are; I will be on that railing.

Mark Foster has changed into beachy white jeans, his subdued dynamism complementary to the high physical activity of the percussionists behind him. For a band whose meteoric rise was born from that overcooked hit “Pumped Up Kicks,” these guys really have it going on.

It’s troubling though; I soon start to think how in certain ways it kind of sucks to stand up here. The sound is shit because the speakers face the audience (sound slut here), and there’s limited dancing room. But somewhere between my finally reaching the front of the railing and “Call It What You Want,” a song that makes me think of my son at home who is a big fan, I lean over and take a full drink of the scene before me.

Thousands of people raise their hands above their heads, clapping together to the collective beat, and during the last song I have a complete view of the armada of life-size beach balls that surges into the pulsing crowd. It is indeed an honor to witness this spectacle from the band’s perspective. I am on top of my world.

Starting around 1:00 you can see me up there in my pink & teal dress + white headscarf:

When it was time to pry myself away from drinks on the beach with Skrillex’s tour manager and go close out the weekend with Beck, I knew exactly where I would be standing. In the motherfuckin’ crowd.

You may recall I saw Beck last year here in Asheville, but this show was a whole other beast. The crush of people wanted one last good party, and the band made sure we got it. A setlist low on songs from last year’s halcyon album Morning Phase, Beck himself seemed genuinely thrilled to rock through his 20-year-old hits as well as playful, scorching takes on fan favorites like “Debra” and a 10-minute combo/outro “Where It’s At/One Foot in the Grave.” What. A. Joy.

Photo by Nina Westervelt via nylon.com

But those festival organizers were not playing around when it was time for everyone to GTFO. Once the band left the stage, even the artists’ lounge shut down, and several of us who tried to get back there for one last hurrah were crudely denied, our royal passes just another accessory after closing time. I launched my gratitude into the culminating fireworks show, Beats Antique’s Tommy Cappel whooping next to me.

With stars in my eyes and sand everywhere, I slogged back to my shared condo where I blended back into the eclectic crowd. There I was just another strange girl in a sea of strangers, squeezing out a few more good times on the beach before the inevitable drive home. And when the morning sun swept its golden tongue over the turquoise waves, I smiled to myself. I know I did what I came to do. I saw some incredible shows and took a big bite of the loftier life in music. And it is just my taste.